QA/QC in the Laboratory

The Philippine Institute of Pure and Applied Chemistry (PIPAC) wil be holding a seminar-workshop on QA/QC in the Laboratory on June 30 to July 1 at the PIPAC building, Ateneo de Manila University Campus, Loyola Heights, Quezon City.

The seminar fee is PHP 6000/person inclusive of training materials, lunch and snacks. Payment may be made upon registration or paid in advance to the account of Philippine Institute of Pure and Applied Chemistry, BPI Loyola Heights with account number 3081 0451 85. Please fax/email the validated deposit.

We look forward to see you in the workshop. For more information, please contact

Eric A. Angeles
+632 4266072
pipac@admu.edu.ph
pipaclaboratory@gmail.com

Philippine representative participates in drafting Global Chemists’ Code of Ethics

Thirty-five chemistry experts from 18 countries drafted the Global Chemists’ Code of Ethics (GCCE) on April 4–6, 2016 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
The workshop that led to the GCCE draft was organized by the American Chemical Society Office of International Activities with support from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and hosted by Institut Kimia Malaysia. Logistical sponsorship for the workshop was provided by the U.S. Department of State Chemical Security Program.

Chemistry professionals from 18 countries, including American Chemical Society president-elect Dr. Allison Campbell (seated, 7th from left), were joined by host Institut Kimia Malaysia president Dr. Ong Eng Long (seated, 6th from right), during the final day of the workshop that led to the Global Chemists’ Code of Ethics. Photo credit: Prof. Dato’ Dr. Mohd. Jamil Maah.

Chemistry professionals from 18 countries, including American Chemical Society president-elect Dr. Allison Campbell (seated, 7th from left), were joined by host Institut Kimia Malaysia president Dr. Ong Eng Long (seated, 6th from right), during the final day of the workshop that led to the Global Chemists’ Code of Ethics. Photo credit: Prof. Dato’ Dr. Mohd. Jamil Maah.

Six categories are covered by the GCCE, namely research, scientific writing and publishing, environment, safety, security, and making positive change happen. In addition to the GCCE draft, executive summaries were prepared for policy makers, industry professionals and academia. Educational materials are also available for institutions and organizations to conduct their own workshops to develop, review, or revise their existing codes of ethics and conduct as appropriate.

The GCCE covers the key elements of The Hague Ethical Guidelines which was published in December 2015 by the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons after the 20th Session of the Conference of State Parties acknowledged these guidelines.

Sole Philippine representative Dr. Patrick John Y. Lim participated in the GCCE workshop and also in the drafting of The Hague Ethical Guidelines. Dr. Lim, who is a professor of chemistry at the University of San Carlos in Cebu City, is the chapter president of Integrated Chemists of the Philippines-Cebu Chapter and is a board member of the Kapisanang Kimika ng Pilipinas.

St Jude Catholic School Defends Championship Title in the 16th DLSU Chemistry Challenge

By Nick Andrei Tan

The Chemistry Department of De La Salle University (DLSU) once again played host to sixty-eight Grade 9 student-contestants, their respective coaches, and guests from thirty-seven high schools in and around Metro Manila for the 16th edition of the Chemistry Challenge, held on 23 January 2016 at the Natividad Fajardo-Rosario Gonzalez Auditorium of the Bro. Andrew Gonzalez FSC Hall. They were warmly welcomed by Dr. Robert Roleda, DLSU’s Vice-Chancellor for Academics, and Ms. Faith Marie Lagua, overall coordinator of the Challenge.

As the student-contestants were busy in answering the Challenge’s Elimination Round, their teacher-coaches and other guests attended the Prof. Richard F. Heck Chemistry Lecture Series, named after the late 2010 Nobel Chemistry Laureate who also served as an adjunct professor in DLSU’s Chemistry Department. Distinguished faculty members of the department gave captivating and relevant lectures. Dr. Rodolfo Sumayao talked about the roles of lysosomes in cells other than being a garbage disposal system. Meanwhile, Dr. David Peñaloza, Jr. enticed everyone about the opportunities in nanotechnology research and its numerous applications. After the two lectures, the audience was treated to a DLSU campus tour courtesy of the DLSU Chemistry Society.

The quiz-bee type final round consists of three parts — easy, moderate, and difficult rounds — each having ten questions. Student-contestants with the top ten scores from the elimination round are qualified in the final round. The battle for the top spot was not smooth at all, as there was a two-way tie between Jinger Chong and Adriel Jeremy Gaw, both hailing from Saint Jude Catholic School. After their intense clincher round, Chong was declared the champion, with Gaw settling for second. This marks the first time since 2008 that a school won on a one-two finish. Also, with Chong’s win, Saint Jude Catholic School successfully defended their championship title for the second consecutive year. It wasn’t the only clincher round, though: Christine Sagun (Sisters of Mary of Banneux, Inc.) and David Ethan Hwang (Xavier School) also fascinated the crowd in their battle for third place, which Sagun eventually conquered. In addition to winning a cash prize and trophy as champion, Chong also received an additional cash prize as the elimination round topnotcher.

The other finalists were: Etienne Joaquim L. Cancio (De La Salle University – Integrated School); Jan Reynald M. Melchor (San Beda College, Alabang); Christian V. Novicio (Sisters of Mary Schools-Adlas); Jilliane Clare N. Lu (Immaculate Conception Academy); Adrian Thomas G. Bandong (Learning Links Academy); and Sherwin John Y. Navarro (Xavier School).

Dr. Glenn Alea, Chair of the DLSU Chemistry Department, and Dr. Derrick Yu, Vice Dean of DLSU’s College of Science, were at hand to congratulate the finalists and their coaches.

The DLSU Chemistry Challenge is the longest-running inter-high school chemistry quiz bee contest for private schools in and around Metro Manila. Its main aim is to identify and recognize students with exceptional talents in the field of chemistry.

Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) Fellowship Programme 2016

This refers to the Note by the Technical Secretariat, Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), regarding a Training Programme under the OPCW Fellowship Programme 2016. It will be held at the OPCW Laboratory, The Netherlands.

The fellowship will involve the development of training materials and e-learning modules for the analysis of compounds related to precursors, degradation products, and by-products of chemical warfare agents.

The fellowship will be for a duration of six (6) months in 2016. The exact date of commencement will be mutually agreed upon by the selected fellow and the Officials of the OPCW Laboratory.

In this regard, the Philippine National Authority on the Chemical Weapons Convention (PNA-CWC) Secretariat invites you to nominate qualified candidate/s, to attend the abovementioned fellowship. Given the purpose and technical nature of the course, candidates will be initially screened by the PNA-CWC Secretariat according to the following criteria:

  1. Chemists by profession;
  2. Have a Master’s or equivalent degree in chemical sciences or engineering, accompanied by an advanced degree (PhD) or five (5) years of relevant experience in a related field;
  3. Have a laboratory experience/ practical experience in the analysis of organic chemicals using chromatography, mass spectrometry techniques, and organic micro-synthesis;
  4. Have a theoretical understanding of other analytical techniques such as infrared and nuclear-magnetic resonance;
  5. Have an experience in the development of training courses, and experience in the analysis of chemicals related to the CWC;
  6. Have good computer skills and proficient in the use of Microsoft Windows; and
  7. Have a good command of English, including excellent writing skills.

Applications from qualified female candidates are highly encouraged.
The pre-selection will be performed by the Officials of the OPCW Laboratory. Three (3) shortlisted candidates will be provided a Letter of Endorsement by their respective National Authorities in order to be eligible for the final selection process. The final selection will be made jointly by the Director of the International Cooperation and Assistance Division of the Secretariat and the Head of the OPCW Laboratory in April 2016. Only one (1) candidate will be selected for the fellowship offered under this programme.

The OPCW Technical Secretariat will provide tutorship, equipment, and infrastructure free of charge and will cover travel-related expenses including airfare and medical insurance. The selected fellow will also receive a monthly allowance to cover basic living costs while in The Netherlands which is set at EUR 2,000 (not taxable).

The recommended candidate is invited to complete the Fellowship Programme Application Form (ANNEX A) and submit it to the PNA-CWC Secretariat (by email to pna.secretariat@gmail.com) no later than 29 February 2016. The Fellowship Programme Application Form must be accompanied by the following requirements:

  1. Up-to-date curriculum vitae;
  2. Essay (NOT exceeding 300 words) outlining the objectives the candidate wishes to achieve and the type of work experience he/she hopes to acquire during the period of the fellowship;
  3. Recommendation letter from the supervisor of the candidate at the institution where he/she is currently working, indicating how the training will be of benefit to the candidate’s present position, institution, and country; and
  4. Scanned copy of the personal identification page of the applicant’s valid passport.

Incomplete requirements or insufficiently detailed applications will not be considered by the PNA-CWC Secretariat.

Should there be queries or clarifications on this programme, the contact person is Ms. Nazrin Camille D. Castro at email address castro.nazrin@gmail.com.

The Hague Ethical Guidelines

A key component of supporting the peaceful uses of chemistry is the promotion of responsible conduct in the chemical sciences; and building on existing ethical standards in the global chemistry community, in partnership with scientific organizations and industry groups around the world.

As a way to further advance this important work, a group of more than 30 scientists and chemistry professionals from over 20 countries convened in The Hague to discuss the ethical practice of chemistry under the norms of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC). Among the 30 scientists is Dr. Patrick John Y. Lim who represented the Philippines. He is the current Chair of the Chemistry Department of the University of San Carlos in Cebu.

The result of two workshops was The Hague Ethical Guidelines which serve as a tool to assess existing ethical codes and inspire new ones in a way which is fully compatible with the aims of the CWC. It is also intended to build understanding between scientists and society, and among scientists themselves, about the culture and practice of responsible science.

The initiative for the drafting of the guidelines for chemical practitioners was initially put forward by Germany which was welcomed by the 19th Conference of the States Parties (CSP). During the 20th CSP, States Parties as well as the Secretariat and all relevant stakeholders were encouraged “to promote awareness of these guidelines and their possible application.”

Click here to read The Hague Ethical Guidelines.

RA Position for Development of Technology for Efficient Microalgae Production

Project Title: Development of Technology for Efficient Microalgae Production: Photobioreactor Design, Feed and High-value Metabolites
Project Leader: Fabian M. Dayrit, PhD
Project Venue: Ateneo de Manila University Department of Chemistry
Project Duration: Until Sept 2016

Qualifications:

  1. BS Chemistry degree
  2. Basic skills in chemical analysis and microbiology
  3. Preferably, background in simple electrical manipulations
  4. Good writing skills
  5. Has the initiative and willingness to learn new skills

For interested applicants, please email Dr. Toby Dayrit at fdayrit@ateneo.edu. Include CV and a list of 3 references.

Two Research Fellowships in Analytical Chemistry Skills Development

This refers to the Note by the Technical Secretariat, Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), regarding the Two Research Fellowships in Analytical Chemistry Skills Development. The programme is organized by the Finnish Institute for Verification of the Chemical Weapons Convention (VERIFIN). The fellowships will be held at the VERIFIN Laboratory in Finland.

The programme is designed for relatively young chemists with relevant practical and theoretical experience in analytical chemistry/ bioanalysis or synthetic chemistry. The fellowships will be for a duration of six (6) months starting in the spring of 2016.

The Philippine National Authority on the Chemical Weapons Convention (PNA-CWC) Secretariat[1] would like you to recommend 1-2 qualified candidate/s, a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Specialistand/or a Synthetic Chemist, to attend the abovementioned programme. Given the purpose of the course, candidates will be carefully selected by the PNA-CWC Secretariat and the OPCW Technical Secretariat according to the following criteria:

NMR Specialist

  1. Have a practical experience in analytical chemistry, including sample preparation and analysis methods of compounds related to chemical weapons agents;
  2. Knowledgeable in both NMR spectroscopy and information technology;
  3. Have a practical experience with computers and basic software; and
  4. Have a good oral and written command of English.

Synthetic Chemist

  1. Should have a practical experience in organic synthesis and gas chromatography;
  2. Should be knowledgeable of organic reactions;
  3. Have a practical experience with computers and basic software; and
  4. Have a good oral and written command of English.

Applications from qualified female candidates are highly encouraged.

Two (2) candidates will be selected for the fellowships offered under this programme in two (2) phases:

  1. Pre-selection of the candidates will be made before 19 February 2016; and
  2. Final selection by the OPCW will be made before 29 February 2016.

In this context, it should be mentioned that VERIFIN will pre-select at least four (4) candidates for the fellowships, whose applications will be forwarded to the OPCW. The Director-General of the OPCW will select the research fellows to be supported by the OPCW, based on the recommendation of the Review Committee. Applications shall comply with the requirements of the OPCW Fellowship Programme, details of which are available on the OPCW website (www.opcw.org).

VERIFIN will provide tutors, equipment, and infrastructure free of charge; while the OPCW will cover travel-related expenses including airfare, accommodation, daily allowances, and medical insurance.

The recommended candidate is invited to complete the Application Form (ANNEX A) and submit it to the PNA-CWC Secretariat (by email to pna.secretariat@gmail.com) no later than 04 February 2016. The Application Form must be accompanied by the following requirements:

  1. Up-to-date curriculum vitae;
  2. Essay (NOT exceeding 300 words) outlining the objectives the candidate wishes to achieve and the type of work experience he/she hopes to acquire during the period of the fellowship;
  3. Recommendation letter from the supervisor of the candidate at the institution where he/she is currently working, indicating how the training will be of benefit to the candidate’s present position, institution, and country; and
  4. Scanned copy of the personal identification page of the applicant’s valid passport.

The Secretariat will provide a Letter of Endorsement in order to be eligible to apply for the programme. Incomplete requirements or insufficiently detailed applications will not be considered by the PNA-CWC Secretariat.

Should there be queries or clarifications on this programme, the contact person is Ms. Nazrin Camille D. Castro at email address castro.nazrin@gmail.com.

Click here to download the Application Form.

The Hague Ethical Guidelines

Applying the Norms of the Practice of Chemistry to Support the Chemical Weapons Convention

The responsible practice of chemistry improves the quality of life of humankind and the environment. Through their many peaceful uses, such as in research and industry, chemicals play an essential role in this improvement. However, some chemicals can also be used as chemical weapons or to create them, and these weapons are among the most horrific in the world.

The 1993 Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) embodies the powerful international norm against chemical weapons, requiring its States Parties “never under any circumstances: (a) To develop, produce, otherwise acquire, stockpile or retain chemical weapons, or transfer, directly or indirectly, chemical weapons to anyone; (b) To use chemical weapons; (c) To engage in any military preparations to use chemical weapons; (d) To assist, encourage or induce, in any way, anyone to engage in any activity prohibited to a State Party under this Convention.” The task of destroying the world’s declared stockpiles of chemical weapons is close to completion, but the threats that the use of chemicals as weapons pose to global security have not yet been eliminated.

As destruction of the remaining chemical weapons continues, a concerted effort is needed to prevent their re-emergence. This includes training and raising awareness among chemistry practitioners, defined as anyone trained in chemistry as well as others dealing with or handling chemicals. Their support is needed so that production and use of chemicals is accompanied by recognition of the responsibility to ensure that they are applied solely for peaceful and beneficial purposes. Fortunately, ethical standards established by the global chemistry community already provide a foundation. Building on that foundation, a group of experts from 24 countries from all regions of the world convened to define and harmonize key elements of ethical guidelines as they relate to chemical weapons based on existing codes.*

Such codes are primary ways through which the community’s ethical standards are addressed. The key elements presented in this text should be incorporated into new and existing codes in order to align with the provisions of the CWC. A code need not mention chemical weapons or the CWC to support its basic goals, and provisions may need to be tailored for particular sectors or circumstances, while still reflecting the fundamental values. Taken together, “The Hague Ethical Guidelines” provide the key elements that should be applied universally.

The Key Elements

Core element. Achievements in the field of chemistry should be used to benefit humankind and protect the environment.

Sustainability. Chemistry practitioners have a special responsibility for promoting and achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals of meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.

Education. Formal and informal educational providers, enterprise, industry and civil society should cooperate to equip anybody working in chemistry and others with the necessary knowledge and tools to take responsibility for the benefit of humankind, the protection of the environment and to ensure relevant and meaningful engagement with the general public.

Awareness and engagement. Teachers, chemistry practitioners, and policymakers should be aware of the multiple uses of chemicals, specifically their use as chemical weapons or their precursors. They should promote the peaceful applications of chemicals and work to prevent any misuse of chemicals, scientific knowledge, tools and technologies, and any harmful or unethical developments in research and innovation. They should disseminate relevant information about national and international laws, regulations, policies and practices.

Ethics. To adequately respond to societal challenges, education, research and innovation must respect fundamental rights and apply the highest ethical standards. Ethics should be perceived as a way of ensuring high quality results in science.

Safety and Security. Chemistry practitioners should promote the beneficial applications, uses, and development of science and technology while encouraging and maintaining a strong culture of safety, health, and security.

Accountability. Chemistry practitioners have a responsibility to ensure that chemicals, equipment and facilities are protected against theft and diversion and are not used for illegal, harmful or destructive purposes. These persons should be aware of applicable laws and regulations governing the manufacture and use of chemicals, and they should report any misuse of chemicals, scientific knowledge, equipment and facilities to the relevant authorities.

Oversight. Chemistry practitioners who supervise others have the additional responsibility to ensure that chemicals, equipment and facilities are not used by those persons for illegal, harmful or destructive purposes.

Exchange of information. Chemistry practitioners should promote the exchange of scientific and technical information relating to the development and application of chemistry for peaceful purposes.

Endorsed by

Professor Muhamad Abdulkadir (Indonesia) Professor Jasim Uddin Ahmad (Bangladesh) Professor Abeer Al-Bawab (Jordan)
Professor Fernando Albericio Palomera (Spain) Professor Jan Apotheker (The Netherlands)
Professor Mahdi Balali-Mood (Islamic Republic of Iran) Professor Djafer Benachour (Algeria)
Dr Mark Cesa (United States of America) Professor Al-Nakib Chowdhury (Bangladesh) Dr Philip Coleman (South Africa)
Professor Dr Hartmut Frank (Germany) Professor David Gonzalez (Uruguay)
Professor Alastair Hay (United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland) Mr Steven Hill (United States of America)
Professor Dr Henning Hopf (Germany)
Dr Jo Husbands (United States of America) Professor Jorge Guillermo Ibañez Cornejo (Mexico) Mr Amirhossein Imani (Islamic Republic of Iran)
Dr Nancy Jackson (United States of America) Dr Patrick John Lim (Philippines)
Professor Mohd Jamil Maah (Malaysia) Dr Detlef Maennig (Germany)
Professor Peter Mahaffy (Canada) Dr Robert Mathews (Australia)
Professor Temechegn Engida (Ethiopia)
Dr Kabrena Rodda (United States of America) Dr Ting Kueh Soon (Malaysia)
Professor Alejandra Graciela Suarez (Argentina) Professor Leiv K. Sydnes (Norway)
Mr Cheng Tang (China)
Professor Natalia P. Tarasova (Russian Federation)
Dr Christopher Timperley (United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland) Dr Hans-Georg Weinig (Germany)
Dr Prashant Yajnik (India)
Dr Muhammad Zafar-Uz-Zaman (Pakistan) Professor Zuriati Binti Zakaria (Malaysia)
Mr Muhammad Setyabudhi Zuber (Indonesia)

*“Code” is used as a general term and includes the full range of such documents, from aspirational statements such as the Hippocratic Oath to codes that are enforceable, for example as part of a practitioner’s terms of employment.